April 4, 2014
"L’imbarazzo degli imbarazzi: l’incontro di due occhi attraverso lo stesso buco della serratura.
- Charles Grodin."

— (via matermorbi)

April 4, 2014
peterfromtexas:

Intro to Internet. 
[via]

peterfromtexas:

Intro to Internet. 

[via]

(Source: theclearlydope, via dolor-)

April 4, 2014
nellynervous:

T.G.I.F.

nellynervous:

T.G.I.F.

April 4, 2014

comunque quelli con lo stomaco debole che vanno in giro a dire che internet è il male io un po’ li capisco

April 4, 2014
steff1024:

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.


now REPEAT this

steff1024:

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

now REPEAT this

(Source: goo.gl)

April 4, 2014

(Source: weird5cience, via creepyste)

April 4, 2014

(via animaconfusa)

April 4, 2014

(Source: naughty-butt-nice, via insidia-mentale)

April 4, 2014

(Source: lorismirandola)

April 4, 2014

(Source: juvenilius, via dolor-)

April 4, 2014
lostateminor:

>
Pet-fi lets your pet help you get connected online

Let’s face it, some of our pets are absolutely useless. When was the last time they actually earned their keep around the house? Pet-Fi (which sounds suspiciously like a joke and might just be one) is apparently the ‘world’s first pet-powered mobile broadband solution’ that puts your pet’s, er, roaming capabilities to good use. All you have to do is clip on the Pet-Fi dongle to its collar, and you can enjoy wireless access to your smart devices within 30 metres of your pet. Plus it’s sustainable — it runs on kinetic energy generated by your pet’s movement.

lostateminor:

>

Pet-fi lets your pet help you get connected online

image

Let’s face it, some of our pets are absolutely useless. When was the last time they actually earned their keep around the house? Pet-Fi (which sounds suspiciously like a joke and might just be one) is apparently the ‘world’s first pet-powered mobile broadband solution’ that puts your pet’s, er, roaming capabilities to good use. All you have to do is clip on the Pet-Fi dongle to its collar, and you can enjoy wireless access to your smart devices within 30 metres of your pet. Plus it’s sustainable — it runs on kinetic energy generated by your pet’s movement.

(via sisifo)

April 4, 2014
tastiereconsumate:

Direi che non c’è bisogno di aggiungere altro.
(via Lo sapeva anche Pavese… | operaidelleditoriaunitevi)

tastiereconsumate:

Direi che non c’è bisogno di aggiungere altro.

(via Lo sapeva anche Pavese… | operaidelleditoriaunitevi)

(via shuly)

April 4, 2014
sundxwn:

Golden Travel by Sunny Kang

sundxwn:

Golden Travel by Sunny Kang

(via buiosullelabbra)

April 4, 2014
earthandanimals:


Japanese Macaque showing middle finger by Jari Peltomäki





They know!

earthandanimals:

Japanese Macaque showing middle finger by 

They know!

(via daizydaizy)

April 4, 2014

(via daizydaizy)

Care to buy me a coffee?